Tag Archives: dependency injection

DI Breakdown

I’m having a philosophical breakdown of the software engineering variety. I’m writing a register allocation library for my current project at work, referencing a not-too-complex algorithm which, however, has many degrees of freedom.  Throughout the paper they talk about making various modifications to achieve different effects — tying variables to specific registers, brazenly pretending that a node is colorable when it looks like it isn’t (because it might work out in its favor), heuristics for choosing which nodes to simplify first, categorizing all the move instructions in the program to select from a smart, small set when the time comes to try to eliminate them.  I’m trying to characterize the algorithm so that those different selections can be made easily, and it is a wonderful puzzle.

I also feel aesthetically stuck.   I am feeling too many choices in Haskell — do I take this option as a parameter, or do I stuff it in a reader monad?  Similarly, do I characterize this computation as living in the Cont monad, or do I simply take a continuation as a parameter?  When expressing a piece of a computation, do I return the “simplest” type which provides the necessary data, do I return a functor which informs how the piece is to be used, or do I just go ahead and traverse the final data structure right there?  What if the simplest type that gives the necessary information is vacuous, and all the information is in how it is used?

You might be thinking to yourself, “yes, Luke, you are just designing software.”  But it feels more arbitrary than that — I have everything I want to say and I know how it fits together.  My physics professor always used to say “now we have to make a choice — which is bad, because we’re about to make the wrong one”.  He would manipulate the problem until every decision was forced.  I need a way to constrain my decisions, to find what might be seen as the unique most general type of each piece of this algorithm.  There are too many ways to say everything.

Advertisements